Frazer, Sir James George

Frazer, Sir James George
(1854-1941)
Born and educated in Scotland, Frazer came to Cambridge to carry out research in 1879, remaining there for the rest of his long career. Originally trained as a classicist, he came to comparative anthropology under the influence of the work of W. Robertson-Smith and Edward Burnett Tylor , although this was based on correspondence with travellers, rather than on fieldwork, and focused almost exclusively on religion and systems of belief.
Frazer was best known in his lifetime for the much read and many-volumed Golden Bough (1890), in which he examined the meaning of divine sacrifice, compulsively adding more and more examples from ethnography, folklore, mythology, and the Bible. Espousing an evolutionary approach, he claimed to have discovered the intellectual history of human societies, progressing from magic, through religion , to science. He viewed the last of these as a return to magical techniques and logic-but using correct (empirically tested) hypotheses and methodologies. It has been suggested that the huge popularity of his work rested on the implication that Christianity is simply a form of magic, an idea that appealed to emerging rationalistic philosophy. His books are little read now, although it is generally acknowledged that his work stimulated ethnographic activity world-wide.

Dictionary of sociology. 2013.

Игры ⚽ Поможем решить контрольную работу

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Frazer,Sir James George — Fra·zer (frāʹzər), Sir James George. 1854 1941. British anthropologist who examined the importance of magic, religion, and science to the development of human thought in his most famous work, The Golden Bough (1890). * * * …   Universalium

  • Frazer, Sir James George — born Jan. 1, 1854, Glasgow, Scot. died May 7, 1941, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Eng. British anthropologist, folklorist, and classical scholar. Frazer attended Glasgow University and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he became a professor and… …   Universalium

  • Frazer, Sir James George — (1854 1941)    An anthropologist who held that all human societies have evolved through similar stages of magical and religious belief. These he established by comparing ancient mythologies with the beliefs and rituals of tribal societies in… …   A Dictionary of English folklore

  • Frazer, Sir James George — (1 ene. 1854, Glasgow, Escocia–7 may. 1941, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, Inglaterra). Antropólogo británico, experto en folclor y textos clásicos. Estudió en la Universidad de Glasgow y en el Trinity College, Cambridge; llegó a ser profesor en este …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • FRAZER, Sir James George — (1854 1941)    a British lawyer influenced by William Robertson SMITH who became the first ever professor of SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY at the University of Liverpool, England in 1907. He quickly retired from this post and devoted his life to writing.… …   Concise dictionary of Religion

  • Sir James George Frazer — noun English social anthropologist noted for studies of primitive religion and magic (1854 1941) • Syn: ↑Frazer, ↑James George Frazer • Instance Hypernyms: ↑anthropologist …   Useful english dictionary

  • James George Frazer — noun English social anthropologist noted for studies of primitive religion and magic (1854 1941) • Syn: ↑Frazer, ↑Sir James George Frazer • Instance Hypernyms: ↑anthropologist …   Useful english dictionary

  • James George Frazer — Sir James George Frazer (1933) Sir James George Frazer (* 1. Januar 1854 in Glasgow; † 7. Mai 1941 in Cambridge) war ein schottischer Ethnologe und Klassischer Philologe. Er gilt neben Sir Edward Burnett Tylor und Émile Durkheim als Mitbegr …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • James George Frazer — Sir James George Frazer Nacimiento 1 de enero de 1854 …   Wikipedia Español

  • James George Frazer — Sir James George Frazer (January 1, 1854, Glasgow, Scotland ndash; May 7, 1941), was a Scottish social anthropologist influential in the early stages of the modern studies of mythology and comparative religion. [Mary Beard, Frazer, Leach, and… …   Wikipedia

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”